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Quizzes on Opposite Adjectives, Verbs & Nouns

It has been a while since I last uploaded free interactive quizzes. This month I will try to make up for the long silence and add a few dozen interactive exercises. So let me invite you to try the brand new quizzes on opposite adjectives, verbs & nouns* (the latter are going to be available in mid-December). Each exercise consists of 10 pairs of antonyms. Your task is to match the pairs before your time is up. Yes, you’ve got it right – there is a time limitInnocent. I set it to 60 seconds per quiz. You would like to know why, I presume. The answer is simple – it takes me 20 seconds on average to do a quiz like that. Can you beat the record?

The quizzes on adjectives are available here, those on verbs here, and the ones on nouns here.

Have fun brushing up your vocabulary!

Do You Speak Legalese?

Legalese is not a real language. Yet it is a human language in a way. It is the way legal professionals word their ideas in contracts and agreements, and that means it can be difficult to comprehend unless you are a lawyer. Whenever you find yourself reading a legal document that is full of long multisyllable words and convoluted sentences and feeling that you should make a conscious effort to understand what that means in plain English, you can be sure that this document is written in legalese. There are a few interactive EFL/ESL Legal English Quizzes on EnglishLab.Net for interested individuals. Feel free to do them – they are not difficult at all! You will learn about different branches of the law as well as types of lawyers (What’s the difference between barristers and solicitors? And what do attorneys have to do with them?), and will find out what exactly they say in films when they take the oath in a court aw before giving evidence


If you believe that these quizzes are not enough and want to take online English lessons, apply to study at EnglishLab.Net


What is a phrasal verb?

A phrasal verb is a verb usually followed by a preposition. The difference between an ordinary verb followed by a preposition (eg look at a word) and a phrasal verb (eg look up a word) is that the meaning of the former can be easily understood once you know the meaning of the base verb (in our case it is the meaning of the verb look), whereas the meaning of a phrasal verb oftentimes has nothing to do with the meaning of the base verb. If you look at a word, you use your eyes to see the word, if you look up a word, you find what it means by consulting a dictionary.

There are two-part and three-part phrasal verbs, the former are verbs followed by only one particle, adverb or preposition, and the latter, as the name suggests, are followed by two of those.

There are some Quizzes on Phrasal Verbs, Dependent Prepositions & Prepositional Expressions on EnglishLab.Net for phrasal verb fans. If a quiz seems somewhat difficult, feel free to look up the phrasal verb or prepositional expression you are unsure of in an online English-English Advanced Learners’ Dictionary such as LDOCE, OALD or CALD.

Good luck!

What’s an Idiom?

An idiom is defined as a word sequence, i.e. a phrase whose meaning cannot easily be worked out from its individual words or, in other words, is not a 100% literal. The degree of transparency of an idiom can range from almost literal, i.e. easily understood, to the totally obscure, i.e. non-literal and impossible to understand until you look it up in a dictionary or someone explains its meaning to you.

Idiomaticity describes the extent to which a learner’s language sounds native-like. What you say may be grammatically correct but not idiomatic, i.e. not natural. Needless to say, learning idioms is as important as learning grammar.

There are many ways of classifying idioms, here are some of the more common types

1. binomials and trinomials

e.g. thick and thin; wait and see; hook, line and sinker

2. euphemisms, i.e. polite words or expressions that are used to refer to things which people may find upsetting or embarrassing to talk about, for instance, sex, the human body, or death

e.g. horizontally challenged, pass away

3. “frozen” similes (traditional comparisons that follow the … as + adjective + as + sth/sb pattern)

e.g. as busy as a bee,  as white as a sheet

4.  metaphorical compounds

e.g. a lone wolf, a hot potato, the evil eye

5. phrasal verbs

A phrasal verb is a verb usually followed by a preposition. The difference between an ordinary verb followed by a preposition (eg look at a word) and a phrasal verb (eg look up a word) is that the meaning of the former can be easily understood once you know the meaning of the base verb (in our case it is the meaning of the verb look), whereas the meaning of a phrasal verb oftentimes has nothing to do with the meaning of the base verb. If you look at a word, you use your eyes to see the word, if you look up a word, you find what it means by consulting a dictionary.

6.  proverbs and catchphrases (also spelt as catch-phrases or catch phrases)

e.g. Get a life! Three strikes and you are out. Size matters.

7.  restricted, i.e relatively fixed, collocations

e.g.  a feasible solution, blissfully happy, descend into chaos

8. fixed or non-literal “turns of phrase” aka “true” idioms

e.g.  a red herring, fly off the handle, since sliced bread


There are some Quizzes on Idioms on EnglishLab.Net (more are on the way, so stay tuned)

Here are a few questions that you will be able to answer once you are done with the quizzes:

  • If something is a bargain, is it cheap or expensive?
  • What is it like if it is up the creeks?
  • What’s her job like if she’s cheesed off with it?
  • What’s a bad hair day?
  • Why would someone speak with a plum in their mouth?
  • How does he feel if he feels blue?
  • Who is a sugar daddy?
  • Whom would you call a square peg?

Do the quizzes and find out!

EnglishLab.Net Interactive English Quizzes, Exercises & Tests

Collocations (5)

with WORK (5)

Grammar (90)

Elementary Word Order Quizzes (5)

Elementary to Intermediate Word Order Quizzes: Question Forms (50)

Quizzes on Active & Passive Tenses (28)

Irregular Plural Nouns. Crossword Puzzles (2)

Spelling Quizzes. Verb Endings -(e)s, -ed & -ing (5)

Exam Preparation (FCE, CAE, CPE) (10)

Word Formation (WF) Quizzes (10)

Vocabulary & Lexicogrammar (65)

American English (AmE) vs British English (BrE) Quizzes (3)

Word Order Quizzes for the Brainy Folk (Jumbled Proverbs & Sayings) (14)

Quizzes on Idioms (8)

Fun Quizzes on Prepositions. Quizzes and Jokes in One (10)

Quizzes on Phrasal Verbs, Dependent Prepositions & Prepositional Expressions (10)

Quizzes on Opposite Adjectives (10)

Quizzes on Opposite Verbs (10)

ESP – English for Specific Purposes (5)

English for Law. Interactive Quizzes (5)

Test Yourself! Trivia Quizzes (27)

Literature

Who Wrote What? (12) 

World Geography & English-speaking Countries

Quizzes on Countries, Capitals, Languages, Nationalities and Patron Saints (15)

 


Total: 201 Revised & Updated Quizzes


   If you believe that these quizzes are not enough and want to take online English lessons, apply to study at EnglishLab.Net